The perks of being disabled.

Because sometimes being an outsider it's not an option.

  • 11th September
    2014
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    2014
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  • 10th September
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  • 10th September
    2014
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    2014
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  • 9th September
    2014
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    2014
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  • 8th September
    2014
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I crave the challenge of life so deeply that it enters my blood stream. I was dealt this life to get the privilege of seeing the universe in such an intensity that you could never begin to understand its beauty unless looking through my eyes. I see legs moving in slow motion and wheels Spinning fast. My head will explode if I don’t run as quick as lightning flashes.
The desire to run is greater than you will ever know. The brain damage keeps me from me from running but I still have the desire to dream bigger than the rotating world.
k.M.R. (via cerebralpalsyintheeyesofkayla)

Nice writing.

  • 8th September
    2014
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    2014
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  • 8th September
    2014
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  • 8th September
    2014
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NEW SHOES!

I found a new kind of shoes with heels I can wear and I’m thrilled! These are wedge heeled sneakers. The heel is on the inside and the width of the sole is enough as to mantain my feet stable.

(You should know that with normal heels, even the tiny ones, my ankles twist as they don’t have enough stability. So these ones nailed it!). They’re also comfortable and high enough to wear with my insoles.

It’s pretty rare for me to find fashionable shoes I can wear, and in addition… FASHIONABLE SHOES WITH HEELS?! They’re like species in extinction. Those extra inches make me feel extra femenin ;)

Usually I cry when I buy shoes but today I was really excited and I wanted to share this with you. I feel awesome!

  • 6th September
    2014
  • 06
Disability + Side effects.

ittygittydiddynator:

theperksofbeingdisabled:

oh-imprettyboy:

theperksofbeingdisabled:

Abled people just don’t understand how bad their applauses make me feel. Last week I tried to explain to my mom this thing about the reverse effect the inspiration porn attitudes get on disabled people —I mean, instead of encouraging, they’re really crappy— and I couldn’t make her understand,…

People should read this.

Disabled people aren’t there to make you feel blessed or be inspired.
That actually sounds really fucked up. “Wow, I’m so lucky (unlike you)!! I don’t realize how easy I have it 99.99% of the time, but you made me realize for half a second that other people don’t have the proper accommodations or care and are treated like they’re undesirable every single day! I’ll forget about this in one minute but WHAT A MOMENT OF ENLIGHTENMENT FOR ME!”

Don’t make other people’s struggles about you. Don’t make them feel uncomfortable by being sympathetic because it makes you feel better as a person. Just listen to them and try to understand their experiences the best you can (which probably isn’t even a fraction of how they actually feel), treat them as the person they are and that means with the same respect anyone else deserves, don’t ask questions about their disability ESPECIALLY if you don’t even know them and they haven’t brought it up, educate yourself and try to advocate for them when you see people treating them poorly…

I’m glad my thoughts are read, my purpose is to make you meditate while you scroll :) Thank you for your solidarity. The disposition for standing in the place of other (at least theoretically) is one good step for it’s actual recognition on their identity.

P.S. Personally I don’t mind being asked about my disability, even by strangers. I prefer that and educating people rather than just being stared at. But I know people who might get offended, so I guess everybody has it’s preference about this issue.

Yeah, the whole “you’re so inspirational” thing really gets to me, too. Just the whole view of praising us just for existing, for just living our lives as best we can, just because we’re disabled. How often it’s happened, and how often people are so eager to try and offer help when it’s not needed… Like the other day when I encountered someone who asked if I needed help loading my chair, and I politely thanked them and said I had it, and then a few minutes later, when the chair was already being lifted up by my lift on top of my chair, I could see the guy get out of his car, and walk around it towards mine, but then stopped when the lift began to close all the way. Or, another time where I was getting out of my car, and some guy came up and grabbed the handlebars of my chair, all, “Don’t worry, I gotcha!” That time actually scared the shit out of me, since I didn’t even see him approach, and so just suddenly heard a voice and had some guy I didn’t know right behind me, holding my chair.

It just all feels so much like it’s really just how good it makes them feel that matters, that,” Oh, I helped the poor cripple girl, gold star for me!” or, “Gosh, I appreciate life so much now, thank goodness I’m not like that!” rather than the fact that we’re actual people. All of it factors into my paranoia of never knowing how much of what I do or do not get has to do with my chair, and I hate always wondering that, even when I don’t want to. I don’t want things for pity, or to not get a chance at something because of an aspect about myself that I can’t help, that shouldn’t even matter.

I just want to be able to do something, and know for a fact that I legitimately earned that; or, have a time where I’m not picked and not have that little voice questioning if it’s just because I honestly wasn’t the best person for the job, or if I could have been, if I weren’t disabled. It’s been heavily on my mind lately, with the lack of luck I’ve had thus far with finding a job, but it’s been something that’s hung over me ever since I was a kid, thanks to all the whispers of, “She only got picked because she’s in a wheelchair!”

Sorry, I kind of took this off into another direction.

Again, reblogging for the comment :)

  • 6th September
    2014
  • 06
Disability + Side effects.

sweettea—and—ferriswheels:

theperksofbeingdisabled:

oh-imprettyboy:

theperksofbeingdisabled:

Abled people just don’t understand how bad their applauses make me feel. Last week I tried to explain to my mom this thing about the reverse effect the inspiration porn attitudes get on disabled people —I mean, instead of encouraging, they’re really crappy— and I couldn’t make her understand,…

People should read this.

Disabled people aren’t there to make you feel blessed or be inspired.
That actually sounds really fucked up. “Wow, I’m so lucky (unlike you)!! I don’t realize how easy I have it 99.99% of the time, but you made me realize for half a second that other people don’t have the proper accommodations or care and are treated like they’re undesirable every single day! I’ll forget about this in one minute but WHAT A MOMENT OF ENLIGHTENMENT FOR ME!”

Don’t make other people’s struggles about you. Don’t make them feel uncomfortable by being sympathetic because it makes you feel better as a person. Just listen to them and try to understand their experiences the best you can (which probably isn’t even a fraction of how they actually feel), treat them as the person they are and that means with the same respect anyone else deserves, don’t ask questions about their disability ESPECIALLY if you don’t even know them and they haven’t brought it up, educate yourself and try to advocate for them when you see people treating them poorly…

I’m glad my thoughts are read, my purpose is to make you meditate while you scroll :) Thank you for your solidarity. The disposition for standing in the place of other (at least theoretically) is one good step for it’s actual recognition on their identity.

P.S. Personally I don’t mind being asked about my disability, even by strangers. I prefer that and educating people rather than just being stared at. But I know people who might get offended, so I guess everybody has it’s preference about this issue.

I’m trying to think of how to phrase this because the point made here are true, very true. I guess as for myself I would rather have people ask questions about my disability rather than stare at me or treat me like I’m sick.

I wish there was some way to get able-bodied people (family members included) to realize that we as disabled people are not inspiring simply because we exist and have a disability.

Reblogging for the comment and with intention to bring discussion. Inspiration it’s something we as disabled cannot control —as I said, I think it’s a side efect of disability. It’s true that some things take a double or triple effort to be made, but as most of us are trying to live our lifes in the most normal way as possible, I have to say that I could dismiss the cheering band that waits for me on the top of every staircase or at the end of a long walk. Turning over phrases like “thank you for being alive” and after examining them for a second I find a condescendent speech similar to “I compliment you for not suiciding yourself because I couldn’t stand a life with disability”. People don’t do it on purpose, they just don’t realize that life with disability is not as horrible as they think. It’s not “the worst life ever”, it’s just a different way of living. Every human has it’s own struggles. Disability is a particular struggle, so particular that’s different for everyone.That’s all.

  • 6th September
    2014
  • 06
Hi there. I think your blog is amazing. I have spina bifida so I seem to relate to a lot of the material. I just wanted to say your beautiful and thank you for doing what you do

Asked by: mysweetdickismagic

Thank you! I appreciate this a lot :) Welcome! I’d love to read you!